• James Essegbey and Fiona McLaughlin (co-PIs) have been awarded a $94,969 grant from the National Science Foundation for a project entitled ‘Documentation and Data Management Workshop to Address Language Endangerment in Multilingual Contexts.’  In conjunction with Dr. Felix Ameka of Leiden University in the Netherlands, they will run the workshop in Winneba, Ghana in the summer of 2017.
  • Akintunde Akinyemi (PI) with James Essegbey and Charles Bwenge(Co-PIs) received $312,000 grant from the Institute of International Education (IIE) for the 2016 African Flagship Languages Initiative Domestic Summer Intensive program. For more information on the program, clickhere
  • Michael Gorham was awarded a Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies to conduct work on his new book project, “Russia’s Digital Revolution: Language, New Media, and the (Un)making of Civil Society,” during the 2013–2014 Academic Year. With only a 5% award rate, the nationally competitive fellowship is designed to allow recipients release from teaching to pursue cutting-edge research full-time.
  • Richard G. Wang was awarded a $44,000 Fellowship from the American Research in the Humanities in China Program of the American Council of Learned Societies, made possibly by funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, to support fieldwork research on Daoism and local society in Ming China for eight months in 2014.
  • Akintunde Akinyemi was awarded a Fulbright Hays Group Project Abroad grant of $165,000 by the International and Foreign Language Education division of the US Department of Education to take American college students to Nigeria for an 8-week intensive Advanced Yoruba language program at the Yoruba Flagship Center on the campus of the University of Ibadan, Nigeria in 2013 and 2014.
  • Akintunde Akinyemi, Charles Bwenge, and James Essegbey were awarded a National Security Education Program (NSEP) grant of $220,620 to organize the 2012 8-week Domestic Intensive African Languages Initiative (AFLI) program in 5 African languages: Akan, Swahili, Wolof, Yoruba and Zulu.  This grant is awarded by NSEP though the Institute for International Education.
  • James Essegbey has been awarded a grant of $13,000 from the Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Documentation Project at the School of Oriental & African Languages, University of London, to document practices related to fishing among the Dwang in the Brong Ahafo region of Ghana.
  • Benjamin Hebblethwaite and his co-PI Laurent Dubois at Duke University have been awarded over $240,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities Collaborative Grant to undertake development on The Archive of Haitian Religion and Culture (www.dloc.com/vodou).
  • Fiona Mc Laughlin has been awarded a Fulbright Africa Regional Research grant to conduct fieldwork on language in a number of West African metropolises.  She will be hosted by the linguistics departments at the Université Cheikh Anta Diop in Dakar, and the Université Abdou Moumouni in Niamey, as well as the West African Research Center in Dakar.