Coming in Summer 20201

A newly designed Summer Study Abroad Program. More info TBA.

Our traditionally face to face course offerings, which all take a communicative approach to learning about the German language and cultural aspects of the German-speaking world:

GER1130 Beginning Intensive German 1

Starting in Fall 2020, we will use the textbook Kontakte from McGraw Hill and supplemental materials such as films, music, and art.

GER1131 Beginning Intensive German 2

In Fall 2020, we will complete the beginning sequence using the textbook Deutsch: Na klar ! from McGraw Hill. Starting in Spring 2021, we will continue the beginning sequence with Kontakte .

GER2200 Intermediate German 1

Starting in Fall 2020, we will use the textbook Kontakte from McGraw Hill and supplemental materials such as films, music, and art.

Discover German: An Asynchronous Online Series

No textbook is required for this series. All materials are available on Canvas.
GER1125 – Online Beginning Intensive German 1
GER1126 – Online Beginning Intensive German 2

For more information on beginning and intermediate German course offerings contact Dr. Will Hasty, Dr. Christina Overstreet, or Dr. Diane Richardson.

View information in PDF

UF in Rome Language and Culture — Summer 2020
STUDY ABROAD INFORMATION SESSION

January 30, 2020 | 5:10PM | 302 Pugh Hall

Come meet faculty and get all the information about the UF in Rome Language and Culture study abroad opportunity happening this summer.

 

Jan. 31 – Rebecca Copeland (Washington University in St. Louis)

Friday, January 31, 4 PM
Pugh 170

Thinking Back Through Mythical Mothers: Modern Japanese Women Writers Retell the Past

In her famous line from “A Room of One’s Own,” Virginia Woolf invites women writers to think back through their mothers—biological, literary, and imaginative. In so doing, she disrupts the heterosexual dyad of male poet-female muse and authorizes a maternal source for inspiration. In this paper, I will discuss the way Japanese women writers have often turned to mythic mothers as a way to legitimize their creativity. From Izanami, to Kishimojin, to the yamamba, these potent images of both nurture and destruction have invited women writers to explore alternate forms of power, sexuality, and social entitlement. Authors to consider will include Kurahashi Yumiko, Ōba Minako, and Kirino Natsuo.

Feb 14. – Melek Ortabasi (Simon Fraser University)

Friday, February 14, 4 PM
Pugh 170

The Wonderful Adventures of Western Children’s Classics in the East

World literature is what happens when literary works travel from their point of origin. How does children’s literature behave differently from “adult” literature when it moves among and across borders? This lecture will examine three influential and highly regarded children’s “classics” – all written over a century ago – and trace their journeys to Japan. American “girls’ books” writer Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women (1868); former soldier and popular Italian travelogue writer Edmondo De Amici’s Cuore (Heart, 1886); and Swedish Nobel Prize winner Selma Lagerlöf’s Nils Holgerssons underbara resa (The Wonderful Adventures of Nils, 1907) were wildly popular at home and abroad. Through a comparative analysis of these works and their translations into Japanese, we will discover how these works of world children’s literature also became “classics” for Japanese children.

Gusdtav Heldt, University of Virginia

Friday, April 03, 4 PM
Pugh 170

Waka Poetry’s Myths of Origin

For centuries after its initial articulation in the Kokinshū anthology, the waka tradition asserted it began with the god Susa-no-o’s song at Izumo. At the same time, this claim to authority was contingent on a longstanding consensus that Japan’s “age of the gods” in general and its songs in particular were constantly open to reinscription. This paper will trace the multiple and occasionally conflicting myths of waka poetry’s origins in the prefaces to the first imperial anthology and its interpolated commentary while considering how these narratives can be further fleshed out by attention to the surviving corpus of song-texts from the age of the gods that are included in the mytho-histories Nihon shoki and Kojiki.


Talks sponsored by the Japan Foundation and the University of Florida Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere
For questions or concerns, contact Prof. Christopher Smith or Prof. Matthieu Felt

French and Francophone Studies Information Session

October 16, 2019 | 3PM | 302 Pugh Hall

Come meet faculty and get all the information about the French and Francophone Studies program, as well as the Study Abroad and exchange programs. Learn about what you can do with the French and Francophone Studies major and/or minor.

  • UF in Paris
  • Rennes Program
  • TAPIF
  • France-Florida Research Institute
  • Le Cercle Français

https://franceflorida.clas.ufl.edu

 

Inscribing the Self on the Small Screen:
How Marguerite Duras Put Literature on TV

Anne Brancky of Vassar College

October 21, 2019 | 4PM | 100 Library East (Smathers)

Some of the most well-known intellectuals of 20th-century France have warned of the dangers of television to thought, to society and to the book. However, Marguerite Duras, a prominent writer and public intellectual, made use of the television as an extension of her literary project. As both an interviewer on state funded television shows during the postwar period, and later as a major cultural celebrity being interviewed herself, Duras foregrounds both her writerly persona and her public image in order to film what amount to literary productions in themselves that would fascinate viewers while simultaneously educating them about social issues.

For more information, please contact Brigitte Weltman-Aron (bweltman@ufl.edu) or Helene Blondeau (blondeau@ufl.edu).

Free and open to the public.

Sponsored by:

  • Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
  • Center for European Studies
  • Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere
  • UF George A. Smathers Libraries

Jan. 16 – David Lurie (Columbia University)

Thursday, January 16, 4 PM
Room TBA

Smug Parables: Anachronistic Self-Congratulation in the History of Writing

The story of the god Thoth and King Ammon in Plato’s Phaedrus is perhaps the most familiar example of a script-origin narrative, but such accounts also exist from ancient China (such as Xu Shen’s postface to the Shuowen jiezi) and Mesopotamia (the poem “Enmerkar and the Lord of Aratta”). There are also rich and provocative ancient discussions of what it means to “borrow” or “adapt” writing from an adjacent (often more powerful) civilization, including a set of related narratives in eighth-century Japanese chronicles about Korean scribes importing Sinitic writing. Such premodern sources can be profitably juxtaposed with modern discussions of colonial and ethnological encounters with literacy, such as frequently quoted and requoted stories of “natives” taken aback at the power of writing, or Claude Lévi-Strauss’s famous “Writing Lesson” (from his 1955 book Tristes Tropiques). This article considers the persistent anachronism that marks such accounts. Whether premodern or modern, it seems they inevitably become parables or allegories of the powers of writing at the time of their composition, rather than plausible reconstructions of its earliest stages. What lies behind this difficulty in writing the history of writing?

Jan 31. – Rebecca Copeland (Washington University in St. Louis)

Friday, January 31, 4 PM
Room TBA

Thinking Back Through Mythical Mothers: Modern Japanese Women Writers Retell the Past

In her famous line from “A Room of One’s Own,” Virginia Woolf invites women writers to think back through their mothers—biological, literary, and imaginative. In so doing, she disrupts the heterosexual dyad of male poet-female muse and authorizes a maternal source for inspiration. In this paper, I will discuss the way Japanese women writers have often turned to mythic mothers as a way to legitimize their creativity. From Izanami, to Kishimojin, to the yamamba, these potent images of both nurture and destruction have invited women writers to explore alternate forms of power, sexuality, and social entitlement. Authors to consider will include Kurahashi Yumiko, Ōba Minako, and Kirino Natsuo.

Feb 14. – Melek Ortabasi (Simon Fraser University)

Friday, February 14, 4 PM
Room TBA

The Wonderful Adventures of Western Children’s Classics in the East

World literature is what happens when literary works travel from their point of origin. How does children’s literature behave differently from “adult” literature when it moves among and across borders? This lecture will examine three influential and highly regarded children’s “classics” – all written over a century ago – and trace their journeys to Japan. American “girls’ books” writer Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women (1868); former soldier and popular Italian travelogue writer Edmondo De Amici’s Cuore (Heart, 1886); and Swedish Nobel Prize winner Selma Lagerlöf’s Nils Holgerssons underbara resa (The Wonderful Adventures of Nils, 1907) were wildly popular at home and abroad. Through a comparative analysis of these works and their translations into Japanese, we will discover how these works of world children’s literature also became “classics” for Japanese children.

Gusdtav Heldt, University of Virginia

Friday, April 03, 4 PM
Room TBA

Waka Poetry’s Myths of Origin

For centuries after its initial articulation in the Kokinshū anthology, the waka tradition asserted it began with the god Susa-no-o’s song at Izumo. At the same time, this claim to authority was contingent on a longstanding consensus that Japan’s “age of the gods” in general and its songs in particular were constantly open to reinscription. This paper will trace the multiple and occasionally conflicting myths of waka poetry’s origins in the prefaces to the first imperial anthology and its interpolated commentary while considering how these narratives can be further fleshed out by attention to the surviving corpus of song-texts from the age of the gods that are included in the mytho-histories Nihon shoki and Kojiki.

DATES: October 10-13, 2019 | University of Florida, Gainesville

The South East African Languages and Literatures Forum (SEALLF) is an annual conference organized by a group of scholars working on African language pedagogy, linguistics, and literature.

Theme: African Languages & Literatures: (Re) mapping the territories, reshaping the strategies.

A throwback to the past will help us understand where we as teachers and administrators of African languages are coming from and may help shape where we are headed. William R. Parker, in an address delivered 66 years ago said “Foreign language teachers cannot alone succeed in lifting America’s Language curtain.”  During this 10th Annual conference we want to examine how far we as stakeholders have lifted the language curtain, review the nature of the fabric of the curtain and set new tasks for ourselves.

There are gains we can claim in the last two decades; one of this is the professionalization of teachers of African languages. If the definition is reviewed critically, it will become clear that teachers of African languages now, “share a common body of knowledge and use agreed standards of practice in exercising that knowledge.” There are definitely rooms for improvement and newer territories to discover in the next decade.

View Program

At this conference, we seek papers and panels that incorporate theories with practice especially;

  • How sustainable relationships with Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) and Community Colleges (CC) can be extended, by promoting teaching and research on African languages, literatures, and cultures in these institutions: A review of the past and recommendations for the future will be appreciated.
  • How sustainable relationships can be created with K-12 teachers: A review of the past and recommendations for the future
  • New praxis in sustaining the development of African languages and literatures.
  • How platforms for strengthening the teaching of African languages and literatures in the southeastern region of the United States can be extended beyond the present: What are the present challenges and future possibilities?
  • Reflection on using new methods for the promotion of the interconnectedness of African languages, literatures, and cultures through, the teaching, research and study of African languages in Colleges of Business, Law, Medicine and other areas not hitherto considered
  • Reflections on collaborative work between scholars and institutions on the African continent and the Diaspora: What are the present challenges and future possibilities?
  • Reflections on cultural connections with the African continent by sharing of resources and expertise on medium and long-term basis: Challenges & possibilities.
  •   Indigenous languages and orature
  •   Language and culture for learners of the future
  •   Language policy in Africa over the years
  • Or any other topic of interest to SEALLF

Contact email for questions, assistance, and submissions: Dr. Kole Odutola,  kodutola@ufl.edu

Deadline for submission: May 20th 2019

Sponsored by:

  • Department of Languages, Literatures, & Cultures
  • African Studies Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Center for African Studies, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Center for Humanities & Public Sphere
  • UF International Center

Directions

From I-75

Exit 384 (SR 24/Archer Road) and head east on Archer Road for 2.6 miles to Gale Lemerand Drive (formerly North-South Drive). Turn left onto Lemerand Drive for 1/2 mile to the light at Museum Road. Turn right onto Museum Road for one block, then left into the UF Bookstore and Welcome Center’s driveway.

From I-95

Heading south toward Jacksonville, take exit 362B to merge onto I-295. Then take exit 21B and merge onto I-10 West. Next take exit 343 towards Starke and merge onto US 301 South. Follow US-301S to NE State Road 24, then take a right on University Ave, Gainesville. Take a left on SW 13th Street (US 441) then turn right at the light on Museum Road for 1/2 mile. The UF Bookstore and Welcome Center is on the right, just past Center Drive.

From US 441 (13th St)

Turn west at the light on Museum Road for 1/2 mile. The UF Bookstore and Welcome Center is on the right, just past Center Drive.

From Gainesville Regional Airport

Exit the airport drive. Right on SR 222 (39th Avenue) for 4 miles to US 441 (13th Street). Left on US 441 for three miles to the light at Museum Road. Right on Museum Road for 1/2 mile. The Welcome Center is on the right, just past Center Drive.

By Plane

The Gainesville Regional Airport is served by two airlines and is located approximately five miles from campus.

For schedules:

Delta Airlines: 1-800-221-1212
American Airlines: 1-800-433-7300

Taxi service from Gainesville Regional Airport to campus cost $12-18 depending on the number of passengers and the amount of luggage.

By Bus

Greyhound provides bus service to Gainesville. Call 1-800-229-9424 or refer to Information and reservations.
Regional Transit Service (RTS) provides bus service throughout campus and the city of Gainesville. Buses are free to UF students. Schedules and route information.

Distance from UF to Florida Cities

  • Jacksonville – 85 miles
  • Miami – 331 miles
  • Orlando – 109 miles
  • Tallahassee – 144 miles
  • Tampa – 128 miles

https://admissions.ufl.edu/visit/directions

Hotels for the conference

Holiday Inn Gainesville-University Ctr
1250 W. University Ave
Gainesville, Florida
32601 United States
TEL: 352-376-1661 Ext 134

Check In: 3PM
Check Out: 11AM